The Power of the Gales of November

While tropical storms and hurricanes continue to attack the region in and around the Gulf of Mexico, the “Gales of November” are stirring up the Great Lakes region just as they have for centuries. This unique weather phenomenon is created when cold, dry air from northern Canada converges with moist air from the Gulf of Mexico, over the still warm summer waters of the Great Lakes.

Throughout the history of the Great Lakes, November has been a prime month for shipwrecks. According to the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum at Whitefish Point (Paradise, Lake Superior), there are over 6,000 shipwrecks throughout the five Great Lakes – with an estimated loss of 30,000 lives. More than 60 of these ships have met their demise during the month of November – the most notably, the Edmund Fitzgerald which sank on November 10, 1975.

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The History Press Contracts with Dianna Stampfler of Promote Michigan for “Michigan’s Haunted Lighthouses” Book

Michigan is home to more lighthouses than any other state and some 30 of those are rumored to be haunted

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“Michigan’s Ghostly Beacons” Scheduled Throughout the Fall Season at Libraries Statewide

For nearly 20 years, Dianna Stampfler has been speaking about Michigan’s lighthouses, their keepers and their ghosts. This fall, she will present a series of free programs called “Michigan’s Ghostly Beacons” at libraries around the state.

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Shedding Light on Michigan’s Historic Female Keepers

Serving as a lighthouse keeper was the only “non-clerical” government job that women were allowed to have in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Michigan had more than 60 women documented as lighthouse keepers at these historic beacons, often serving as assistant keepers with their husbands, fathers or brothers—and in the case of tragedy, many were promoted to the role of head keeper.

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Great Lakes, Great Times – in Pure Michigan

Michigan has been welcoming travelers since the 1800s who arrived by steamer ships, trains and later personal automobiles to escape the city heat in Chicago, St. Louis and other locales. They were drawn to the sugar sand beaches, the cool waters and the often allergy-free environment.

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