Daughter-in-Law of Famed Author Ernest Hemingway to share Stories with the General Public, April 28, in Walloon Lake

Valerie Hemingway, former personal assistant for and later daughter-in-law of the Nobel and Pulitzer Prize winning author, is the guest of honor at a special program on Saturday, April 28 at t The Talcott Event Center in Walloon Lake. The event is part of a three-day “The Last Good Country: Walloon Lake, An Ernest Hemingway Occasion” weekend at the award-winning Hotel Walloon.

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Cooking Up Food & Friendships

Growing up, many family traditions were centered around the table. After launching Promote Michigan in 2004, I found myself drawn to certain sectors of the hospitality industry: restaurants, wineries, breweries, distilleries, farm markets and agricultural organizations. Yes, I found a way to get paid to eat and drink…how lucky! I was also building a network and often friendships with chefs who were eager to feed my desire to learn more about locally-sourced ingredients and unique ways to prepare them into delicious dishes.

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St. Julian Brings Home 34 Medals from International Eastern Wine Competition

St. Julian Winery was recently presented a total of 34 medals—including one “Best of Show,” four “Best of Class” and three “Double Gold” awards—at the International Eastern Wine Competition held February 6-7 in Santa Rosa, CA. St. Julian was one of five Michigan wineries from four distinct federally-recognized American Viticultural Region (AVAs) to participate in the competition.

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Hotel Walloon presents The Last Good Country: Walloon Lake, An Ernest Hemingway Occasion

Hotel Walloon is pleased to present The Last Good Country: Walloon Lake, an Ernest Hemingway Occasion. This third annual event celebrating Ernest Hemingway’s connection to the northern Michigan area will take place Friday, April 27 through Sunday, April 29, with special guest Valerie Hemingway, who was both a personal assistant and daughter-in-law to the late author.

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Celebrating Michigan’s Irish Communities

Irish immigration to Michigan dates back to the early 1800s, with a heavy increase between 1845 and 1855 during a period of famine in Ireland, lasting well into the 1920s. Starting first in Detroit, the Irish made their way north and westward, landing throughout both the Lower and Upper Peninsulas where they found work in factories, fishing villages and copper mines. Nearly one-third of Michigan’s foreign-born population was from Ireland in 1870. Today, only about 10% of the state’s 9.9 million population is of Irish descent, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

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Shedding Light on Michigan’s Historic Female Keepers

Serving as a lighthouse keeper was the only “non-clerical” government job that women were allowed to have in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Michigan had more than 60 women documented as lighthouse keepers at these historic beacons, often serving as assistant keepers with their husbands, fathers or brothers—and in the case of tragedy, many were promoted to the role of head keeper.

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Giving Thanks for Life in Northern Michigan

It was Thanksgiving of 2009 when it really sunk in for me…spending five days alone in Empire for the holidays and being at peace with it. This year, I will celebrate Thanksgiving in Walloon Lake at “Mi Storybook Cottage” – where I am blessed and thankful once again for being able to live in such a beautiful place, making a living doing what I love and having the support of my family and friends.

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